Lunch and Learn

/Lunch and Learn
Lunch and Learn 2018-09-16T21:25:09+00:00

Lunch and Learn

Composition of Concrete

Understanding Fiber Reinforcement

This presentation discusses the various types, perfomances, and common applications where microsynthetic, macrosynthetic and steel fibers can be used in lieu of traditional reinforcement. Fibers have been around for 30+ years and offer a viable solution for certain reinforcement objectives. Reviewing the ASTM testing methods provides insight how fiber performance is compared with traditional.  This understanding opens up additional design options offering value for your projects and clients. Proper finishing methods and applications will close out the discussion.

Composition of Concrete

Concrete Paving Design Adoption by DOT For Use In Local Streets and Roads

The paving market has been on cruise control in favor of asphalt with the absence of a DOT accepted concrete design for local streets and roads in the Carolinas. This presentation looks at the recent concrete design adoption by both SCDOT and NCDOT and how design professionals can incorporate proper design methods for long term performance with little maintenance and upkeep making concrete a viable and competitive alternative to the norm.

Composition of Concrete

ACI 330 Guidelines for Design and Construction of Concrete Parking Lots

Concrete parking lots serve many kinds of public facilities, commercial developments, businesses, and multifamily housing projects. They primarily accommodate parked vehicles, but may also provide maneuvering areas and access for delivery vehicles. This presentation focuses on the design guidelines per ACI 330 for construction of concrete slabs for parking lots and outside storage areas. A good design needs to take into account site investigation, adequate thickness, joint layout and details, durability considerations, paving operations, and quality assurance procedures during construction.

Composition of Concrete

Architectural Initiatives to Reduce the Carbon Footprint of Concrete

This course addresses the complexity and scale of greenhouse gas emissions produced by the concrete industry and the role architects can play to reduce these emissions. It explores the actions that have been employed by the cement and concrete industries to lower their environmental impact. Market drivers that address materials’ environmental footprint such as LEED and the Living Building Challenge will be addressed. Impact measurement tools such as Environmental Product Declarations will be discussed. The course will conclude by exploring emerging innovations to reduce the carbon footprint of concrete.

Composition of Concrete

Build With Strength: Concrete Value and Innovations*

Durability is the ultimate ingredient of sustainable architecture and profitability. Builders are realizing that the promise of low first-cost is insufficient for portfolio value generation. From energy efficiency, lower insurance costs, and moisture resistance, barriers to a concrete structure increasingly collapse when industry professionals are equipped with the right design tools and knowledge. Building materials also play a big role in deciding the safety and resiliency of our structures. Through design solutions demonstrated in this workshop, we can focus on building with strength resulting in investments that are secure and generate long-term value to the owners. The course will conclude with awareness of existing, free design resources to assist project teams.

Composition of Concrete

Performance Based Specifications – State of the Industry and Way Forward

This presentation was developed by the Research Engineering and Standards Committee of the National Ready Mixed Concrete Association (NRMCA). It discusses the general concept and benefits of minimizing prescription and incorporating performance-based alternatives for concrete mixtures in project specifications. Obstacles to performance-based specifications and available resources will be discussed. The primary focus of the presentation is on specific prescriptive  items most commonly found in actual specifications; real or perceived basis for the requirement; possible problems caused by these requirements; suggested alternatives; and benefits of these alternatives. These suggestions are consistent with industry standards like ACI 318 and ACI 301. These items are also summarized in informational Specification in Practice (SIP) topics (optional: that will be provided to attendees).

If you’d like to schedule a lunch and learn presentation at your office, please contact Drew Turner. If you do not see the concrete topic you are interested in, please let us know and we will try to accommodate your interest.

*Topic to be given by an NRMCA representative